RGB LED Projector Christmas Hack

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RGB LED Projector Christmas Hack (1/2 steps)

Step 1: The circuit

RGB LED Projector Christmas Hack

RGB LED Projector Christmas Hack

RGB LED Projector Christmas Hack

RGB LED Projector Christmas Hack

RGB LED Projector Christmas Hack

The only thing I bought for this project was the RGB LED spotlight. The other parts I had around the pose (would have cost about $ 20 more for the purchase of all). This is what I used:

My assumptions for this instructable are that you already have knowledge of using an Arduino and working safely with electricity. I will not go into depth how I tested the circuits or how to download the sketch to the Arduino. The Arduino is inexpensive and very easy to learn and there are some great beginners Instructable about using an Arduino. I’m not an expert when it comes to coding, I’m sure it’s going to be nicer.

Just a little word here to spare you headaches – I have a few LED strips that use an identical remote control look like what came with this light projector – although the remote controls seem identical they send different codes and can Not be exchanged. Wondering if your infrared transmitter is working? Remember that you can always point the camera of your cell phone to an infrared transmitter to see if it works. You do not see it blinking with the naked eye, but with a digital camera, you will see the flashing transmitter if it works.

I used the 3-way selector with the Arduino in the past with excellent results. Credit goes to this site to share this easy to setup selector.

Ken Shirriff IR Library for the Arduino is what makes this project run. You must add this library for things to work. To decode the remote control that came with the projector, I used the information on its site and the sketch of the example provided with the library. This is my understanding that the current Arduino IDE contains a RobotIRemote library that conflicts with the IRremote library needed for this project. You can remove the RobotIRemote library to resolve this conflict. If in the future you buy this robot and need the library, it is quite easy to reinstall it.

I used a 220-ohm resistor on the IR transmitter because that’s what I had to drag. Actually, I used a dual transmitter extension that came from an old Tivo I think. The two transmitters fire very well – I’ll keep it in mind for the next Halloween where I can control two floods at the same time to light up the front of my house.

I was concerned first of all about having to add a detector circuit to check if the light is on or off but was happy to find the powers of light on any signal. Another bonus is that when I opened the light there was tons of space to hide my model inside! Things got even better when I tested the power goes the IR detector and it was clean enough to run the Arduino so I did not need to worry about a separate power supply. It does not appear in the diagram, but I wired to Wine off the 5v + to the IR detector and Arduino ground detector. Please make sure you never have the Arduino powered by USB and LED driver at the same time. Note: this way of feeding the Arduino actually provides a little less than the recommended voltage. If in your test you have intermittent problems, try to feed the Arduino by a real power supply. I have found as long as I do not use long delays that everything works.

Everything else needs to be explicit if you open the total size of the photos and read the comments.

After all the threads, some will make you add the library IRremote and load the sketch above. The sketch of the Arduino is version # 2. In the first version, I had some very long delays that turned out to be rather annoying! I accelerated everything significantly. Also with version 1, on really long delays, it seemed things “hung up” now and then: this could be the one with my Arduino being off the circuit of the IR detector that it is actually running a little below the recommended voltage. With the help of shorter deadlines, it seems so far that things are working well.